Breaking Bad post 1. Opening Shots.

We’re exploring the opening 10 minutes of Breaking Bad.

John Truby described it as

one of the best dramas in the history of television.

So how do the writers and series creator Vince Gilligan draw us in?

What information does he feed us?

How does he fill his precious, all-important opening 10 minutes?

Let’s take it scene by scene:

Scene 1.

FADE IN to a still shot of a cactus in a desert. Blue sky fills the background. Perfect nature.

Screen Shot 2016-01-21 at 1.42.42 PM

Except, wildlife sounds squeak and squawk. We know that all is not peaceful in the desert.

Animals kill. Predators prey.

But the opening shot is devoid of one thing: mankind.

It also has no movement. We hesitate on this image for 6 seconds.

CUT TO: another still image: a rocky mountain cast in shadow. Deep blue sky again fills the background.

Screen Shot 2016-01-21 at 2.41.24 PM

Wildlife squawks louder. We linger here for 3 more seconds.

CUT TO: a third image – another rock.

Screen Shot 2016-01-21 at 2.41.50 PM

Americans will probably recognize it as the New Mexico desert.

The scene is natural. Still.

CUT TO: perfect blue sky.

Enter ‘mankind’ in its absurdity as a pair of man’s pants fall through the sky.

Screen Shot 2016-01-21 at 2.53.56 PM

CUT TO:

the ROAR of an RV as it explodes through the peaceful desert, running over the pants…kicking up dust… man versus nature… man causing destruction.

Screen Shot 2016-01-21 at 3.06.35 PM

and…

BANG!

We’re into the chaos of Breaking Bad!

That’s the opening 20 seconds.

Compare to the opening scene of Peaky Blinders.

 

 

 

What do you think?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s